6% of India’s GDP should be spent on education

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Advocate for budget expenditure on education to be 6% of GDP with Ministry of Finance.

Annual budgets presented by the Governments are not just statements of finances but are factual reflection of their policies, programmes and strategies. While a government’s budget directly or indirectly affects the lives of every one of its citizens, it can have significant impact on certain groups like children, women, the poor, rural residents and weaker and marginalized sections of the society.

The Kothari Commission (1964-66) recommended an allocation of 6% of the GDP for education. National Education Policies of 1968, and 1986 (as modified in 1992) also endorsed a norm of 6% of GDP as the minimum expenditure on education.

The current Government in its Election Manifesto (2014) pledged for “public spending on education raised to 6% of GD0P”. However, this target has never been met. The expenditure by Education Departments of the Centre and States has never risen above 4.3% of the GDP, and is currently around 3.5%.

In India, Children constitute 39% of the total population and on an average they receive 4% of the total allocation in the union budgets of the country. The demands of allocation of 6% of the GDP to education have never been met.

Join Global Citizen India by asking our government to deliver on their promise and tweet using

  1. Upload a picture to Facebook with your creative take on the number 6.
  2. Post the picture with a message about the importance to budget for higher education along with the hashtags.#FinanceMinistry #IStandFor6, GlobalCitizenIndia.

Source: Global Citizen India

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